“Marshall” Your Forces: “Stand Up for Something”

His name means justice. Tagline for Marshall, about Thurgood Marshall (1908-1993)

As described on Rotten Tomatoes, new film Marshall has a star-studded cast and “is based on an early trial in the career of Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall. It follows the young lawyer (Chadwick Boseman) to conservative Connecticut to defend a black chauffeur (Sterling K. Brown) charged with sexual assault and attempted murder of his white socialite employer (Kate Hudson). Muzzled by a segregationist court, Marshall partners with a courageous young Jewish lawyer, Samuel Friedman (Josh Gad). Together they mount the defense in an environment of racism and Anti-Semitism.”

The soundtrack features the timely and trending hit “Stand Up for Something,” by Andra Day and Common, that’s already inspiring people to commit to meaningful causes. Watch the music video below and then check out #StandUpForSomething to add your voice.

I stand up for compassion. Andra Day

I stand for peace. Common

Here’s a trailer for the film, which recently opened in a theater near you:

Selected Remarks from the Film Critics

Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times:

Though Marshall‘s script engages in a certain amount of fictionalizing, the basic outlines of this case, far-fetched and right out of Erle Stanley Gardner though some of it may seem, did actually take place.

And while the film is constructed from top to bottom for maximum popular entertainment, it is unwilling to let us leave the theater without reminding us that these battles are far from over.

Close to the end of the credits, the voice of the real Thurgood Marshall (who died in 1993) is heard on the soundtrack, talking about not taking civil rights gains for granted.

‘There are movements by the different branches of this government that are set to push back,’ he says, uncannily prophetic. ‘Only now it’s being done, you know, cleverly.’

Brian Lowry, CNN: “…a 75-year-old story imbued with modern-day resonance.”

Richard Brody, New Yorker: “…(T)he movie urgently dramatizes the threat of racist violence that poisons personal relationships and judicial proceedings alike.”

Peter Keough, Boston Globe: “In this time of intensifying, acrimonious racial division, maybe what we could all use is an old-fashioned courtroom drama that extols the virtues of justice and equality.”

Matt Zoller Seitz, rogerebert.com: “It pays attention to issues of racial, religious and gender discrimination without wavering from its main objective: giving us an entertaining film about a couple of guys who are in way over their heads.”

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