“Sociopath: A Memoir” by Psychologist Patric Gagne

Patric Gagne, PhD, author of the new Sociopath: A Memoir had her suspicions about herself confirmed when she was in college. From the publisher: “She was told there was no treatment, no hope for a normal life. She found herself haunted by sociopaths in pop culture, madmen and evil villains who are considered monsters. Her future looked grim.”

However, with the aid of various types of therapy, Gagne did adjust. The approximately five percent of the population who also have sociopathic traits may feel heartened to hear this.

The genre of Sociopath: A Memoir is similar to the also-female-written Confessions of a Sociopath, addressed in this previous post. But, unlike that book’s author, this one not only fully outs herself by name but also is a trained clinical psychologist.

According to David Marchese, New York Times, Gagne had demonstrated “remorselessness, criminality and lack of empathy” before dealing with her eventual diagnosis and treatment. “The desire to destigmatize her experience and also to help others who may share it (Gagne previously worked as a therapist to those with the disorder and has also written about sociopathy) put Gagne on a path that led to ‘Sociopath.’

Her bio states the following about her current mission: “Today I am working to expand the definition of sociopathy to include its status as a spectrum disorder. Sociopaths are not inherently evil people. We suffer from what I believe to be an emotional learning disorder, one which is both relatable and treatable.”

Selected quotes from her interview with Marchese:

Sociopathy is a perilous mental disorder; the traits associated with sociopathy aren’t great. But that only tells part of the story. The part that’s missing is you can be a sociopath and have a healthy relationship. You can be a sociopath and be educated. That’s a very uncomfortable reality for some people. People want to believe that all sociopaths are monsters and that all monsters are easy to spot…

The way I experience love seems to be very different from the so-called neurotypical experience. My experience of love seems less emotional. If I had to explain what love feels like to me, I would say symbiotic. So, a relationship that’s beneficial to both people involved. Not transactional, not possessive, not ego-driven. Mutual homeostasis. It’s not that I’m unable to access emotions or empathy. It’s that my experience of those emotions is different….

My gift to my therapy patients was that I was able to lend them sociopathy: Why do you care? What does it matter? What do you need from that? That, I felt, helped them achieve things that maybe a nonsociopathic therapist couldn’t have offered.

Listen, everyone has a front-facing persona. Most people use that persona as a preference: a desire to be liked, a fear of judgment, wanting somebody to be friends with them. But sociopaths use it out of necessity, and that’s a really important distinction….

I like that I don’t have guilt because I’m making my decisions based on logic, based on truth, as opposed to ought or should. Now, there is a flip side. I don’t have those natural emotional connections to other people, but I’ve never had those. I don’t feel like I’m missing anything. Just because I love differently doesn’t mean my love doesn’t count.

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